Gangster Granny Admits Role in Million Dollar Drug Ring - The New York Criminal Law Blog

The New York Criminal Law Blog

Gangster Granny Admits Role in Million Dollar Drug Ring

Would this make a better movie than Frank Lucas’ tale? A local grandmother, Doris ‘Mama Dot’ Smith, admitted in court to her role in a family-run drug ring that did over a million dollars per year in business, reports the Daily News. The 72-year-old was caught on wiretaps warning her son-in-law Lamont Moultrie, 42, about the cops’ presence and advising him on how to best escape the building.

Mama Dot was the co-op board president of her apartment building, which gave her access to a vacant unit, as well as the basement, to use for storing and preparing drugs for sale. The family allegedly stored baggies of heroin and crack in the basement. They used the spare apartment as a facility for dipping spearmint leaves in PCP, which were then sold for $10 apiece.

Reports differ on Mama Dot's personality. Some of her neighbors (who sound a little envious) lamented her strutting her wealth and her Lamborghini. Others recounted how she used to dress up as Santa Claus and provide gifts for all of the neighborhood children.

We're predicting the movie version will hit theatres by 2020.

The gangster granny pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance and conspiracy to distribute drugs. She will be sentenced to five years in prison.

Meanwhile, her son-in-law and his brother each face prosecution under New York's Drug Kingpin statute. The statute, also known as "Operating as a Major Trafficker," provides that someone is guilty of being a major trafficker if:

  • they act as director of a drug ring that, as an organization, does more than $75,000 in business in a year or less, or
  • the individual sells $75,000 worth of drugs in six months or less, or
  • the individual possesses with intent to sell, on one or more occasions over six months, $75,000 worth of drugs.

The kingpin crime is a class A-I felony, meaning a conviction could lead to a sentence of eight to twenty years for a first-time offender, more if he has a record.

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